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up. we haveback. and we know in our hearts but for the united states of america erybody. i'm thomas topping our agendatoday, four more for 44. putting the wind at his back president obama now looks ahead to a second term. calling himself more determined and inspired to face the challenges ahead.vñ the presiden second:w t electorage overallenger 303 electoral vos. and a narrow da too close to acceptance speech inicago, he mentioned rifts and cracksline his road back to the white house. >> i believe we can seize this future together. because we aot oursuggest. we'r the pundits believe.ambitions. and we rema states and states. united states of america. >>+l in the end as wildly what put the that all important 2708" electoral vote threshold. the workers pulling obama in the state that was the lin ohiotes that together made up obama midwest firewall, the second bng ryan's home state of i recall forthen-senator obama four years ago. in north carolina and asked pundits to come together sake of the >> america's at al point. we can't risk political do theu
this will becialdition of "morning joe."way. >>> ey long have fought our way back.now in our hearts that united states of come. and welcome to a special edition of "morning wednesday, november 7the mornihe- new york city in front of a great, awake. what's wpeoplele? >> have y >> unbelievable. well there's just a little news to report this morning. president obama has won a second term in the white house. >> what? >> this is huge. go ahead.11:15 last night, the ne presid>
and security of the >>guest: it is. the part of the world with united states has been involved in the iran-iraq war, desert shield, desert storm and operation in iraqi freedom. it is a big topic and it needs to be discussed and investigated. >>host: where do you begin talking about u.s. involvement? >>guest: the u.s. involvement in the valleys goes much further back. we specifically look at the persian and gulf even though they sent some ships it is really world for to the united states and military get involved in a big way. surprisingly it does not have to do with the oil. world war ii marked the entry of the united states and its military to provide a secure pathway for supplies to the beleaguered soviet russian allies in their quest to defeat the germans. the persian gulf was one pathway to bring e equipment through the back channel through persia through the mountains picked up by a the russians by tehran. and a much smaller percentage were involved with trading missions with there and and saudi arabia. but our 60,000 uniformed troops left the supply delivery business to rush up. thos
for an unprecedented showtime series called the untold history of the united states. the show kicks off on showtime and also features his companion botook. first of preview of the untold history of the united states. >> roosevelt made his solos move yet. the stakes have rarely been higher in a presidential election, and roosevelt shows his secretary of agriculture as his running mate. wallace had been at the nerve center in sawing off the perils of the great depression, easing the way of government subsidies with farmers to stay in business by cutting back on production. wallace provided food stamps. he instituted programs for land use planning and soil conservation. wallace spoke out strongly against the building up of false and racial theories and review the hitler policy in germany. -- and criticized the hitler policy in germany. tavis: let me start with politics. i am glad we have got to shows. there is a lot to talk about with regard to the text and the showtime series. i thought i read that you hoped obama would win. tell me what you expect tomorrow and why you hope the president will pull th
. it's part of the world where the united states has been involved in three hot wars in the past generation, the iran-iraq war, desert shield, desert storm, and operation iraqi freedom. it's a big topic, and it needs to be discussed, and investigated, which is part of the reason why we took on this topic. >> host: in your book, where do you begin talking about u.s. involvement in the middle east? >> guest: well, the u.s. involvement in the middle east goes much further back. we're specifically looking at the persian gulf, and although u.s. navy frigates and ships paid some port calls in previous centuries, it really is world war ii that the united states and its military gets involved in the gulf in a big way. >> host: why? >> guest: well, surprisingly, it doesn't have to do directly with oil. world war iimarked the entry of the united states and its military for two reasons. one is to provide a secure pathway for supplies to our bee league erred soviet russian allies in their quest to defeat the germans. so the persian gulf route represented one pathway the united states could s
asian history. >> guest: united states is still very much engaged in that corner of the worldment we have many alis and partners we're working with, and many students, midshipman, are going to be officers who are going to go to southeast asia and represent our interests there. so i think it's important for them to know southeast asian history to be comfortable with the culture and have some knowledge of their history. >> host: well, professor ruth. one of our long-time allies is thigh taken, and you have written a book called "in buddha's company: thai sole soldiers in the vietnam war." what role did they play? >> guest: thailand was a close ally of the united states during the vietnam war. many people who are official with the circumstance good-familiar with the circumstances of she vietnam, but not only thailand sent troops but also served as a base for many of the aircraft that were flying, bombing missions over laos and south vietnam. at the time we had built seven air bases and developed a port there as well to facilitate the u.s. effort in the vietnam war and also many america
that not only did thailand send troops to fight along the united states, but also served as a base for many aircraft for bombing missions over ho chi minh trail, over laos and at the time we had built seven their bases and developed a port as well to facilitate the u.s. effort and also many soldiers went to bangkok and in terms of support thailand was the close ally. >>host: did they have soldiers? >> absolutely. they spent 37 -- cent to 37,000 soldiers to fight in vietnam also they sent smaller naval units but definitely fighting and working with the united states and south vietnamese. >>host: what about casualties? >> 500 + that died in south vietnam while fighting the the it can't -- vietcong. it is important because of those who don't know 10 to dismiss them as the insulting term is america and mercenaries because we paid for the military part where but for four years thailand would carry out the war and what they saw as their war in south vietnam's. casualty's is what we should keep in mind. >>host
in the record as saying nothing in this treaty will require any initiative by the united states to change a law or reduce any capacity of our courts to uphold the constitution of the united states. and i think he did an important service in his comments with respect to to that. our fight is not over, we have some work to do in the next days and i look forward to working with him on that. mr. lugar: i join the chairman in thanking john mccain for his testimony, his courage, his eloquence, his mention of those on our side of the aisle historically who have fought for the disabled. that's a very important fact today, and his presence, his strength, and determination were very inspiring. we appreciate so much his testimony. mr. kerry: mr. president, i suggest -- the presiding officer: the senator from massachusetts. mr. kerry: i suggest the absence of a quorum and ask that time be charge against both sides. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: mr. durbin: mr. president? the presiding officer: senator from illinois, the assistant leader. mr. durbin: i ask that the quorum
.c., the headlines this hour -- barack obama has won a second term as president of united states. he promised the next four years will be better than the last. >> our road has been hard, our journey has been long, and we are kicking ourselves up and fighting our way back. we know in our hearts that for the united states of america, the best is yet to come. [applause] >> his challenger, mitt romney, but -- conceded defeat. many of the key battleground states went to the democrats. >> i just called the president to congratulate him on his victory. his supporters in the campaign also deserve congratulations. i wish them well, particularly the president, the first lady, and their daughters. >> world leaders have been offering congratulations to barack obama. we will assess the challenges he faces in his second term. >> well, lo, welcome again to washington, d.c. -- well, hello, welcome again to washington, d.c. people are waking up to the news that they have four more years with barack obama as their president. he won the electoral college and has 303 electoral college votes so far. the president
of the united states. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: part two of our conversation with oliver stone and peter kusnick. their 10-part series on showtime kicks off next monday night. now is another preview of "the. history of the united states. " -- "the untold story of the united states. " >> i steadied american history. it made sense. we were the center of the world. there was manifest destiny and we were the good guys. i have traveled the world now. i continue my education as an infantryman in vietnam. made a lot of movies, some of them about history. and i have learned a lot more about what i once knew. and when i heard from my children what they're learning in school, i w
at the last 10 years, americans still feel the united states has a positive place in the world, a positive role to play. they're uncertain about the implications of the arab spring, but they see the middle east as the greatest source of future threats to the united states by far and are apprehensive at the same time about how u.s. involvement there can be effective and less costly. they clearly see asia as the region of rising opportunity for the united states, though they're mindful of the potential threats for the longer term that might come from asia, focusing especially on china and its extraordinary economical growth. my presentation will go from here basically four parts. first i'm going to elaborate a little bit on how americans perceive the threats facing the united states and we frame the goals for u.s. foreign policy. secondly, what kind of role, broadly speaking, do they want the united states to play in the world. thirdly, what are their policy preferences for achieving those goals. and finally, a little more in particular on how they view the middle east and asia. so first, we
. while the guard is part of the air force, units -- units in each state are under the command of governors and so the guards relationship with the active duty force can sometimes be strained. that's been the case since february when the air force said that of 9,900 proposed personnel cuts, 5100 would come from the guard. a move that sparked a fire storm of protests on capitol hill. lawmakers governors and guard leaders accused the air force of failing to coordinate cuts they say fell disproportionately on citizen airmen and in protest the congress prohibited the air force from executing $9 billion in cuts freezing the services ability to shed personnel to meet targets for the budget. the new chief of staff general mark welsh on the show a few weeks ago said that one of his top priorities is to improve the relationship and regain control of his budget. joining us today to talk about the state of the relationship and the future is the director of the air national guard, lieutenant general "bud" wyatt. sir, welcome to the program. >> thanks, great to be here. >> so let's first st
yes, countries -- if we look at the most recent presidential election in the united states, there was something if he went through the republican primaries people were saying let's not this person. it's not tim pawlenty dropshot right after the audio what caucuses and then michele bachman dropshot and new gingrich can you are left with a sort of one person left standing. it's not about picking a winner. it's about picking losers. this is not the person, this is not the person. and finally you get the last person standing. the process of elimination. >> host: which is consistent in better organization it tends to be. >> it is a simplified version of reality that i think you used to build the theories that are simple and then you make them more complex but if you take say gee so they're famous for the way they choose leaders. we always tell our students g is a company that works in practice but not in theory. it doesn't seem to do any of the things that we say it should do but it is successful. and if you have the competency, it seems to be that it's good at picking leaders c
policy here at gw. special assistant to the president of united states for national-security affairs, staff of the national security council, principal deputy for public affairs. air force, retired with rank of colonel in september 2009. i want to get started going back four years. the inauguration of barack obama. a lot was made at the time about how, at least on one side of the aisle, barack obama was a walking, talking example of public diplomacy in action. he was going to change america's perception in the world, and to all these wonderful things like clothes guantanamo bay and and torture. he went out -- close guantanamo bay and end torture. four years later, opinion of america and things american have improved here and there, but certainly not to the degree that i think a lot of people, including people in the administration expected going into this period of time. if you look at the few global -- pew global attitudes index, opinion of the united states is in negative co territory for every country they serve it in the middle east, also china, it india. -- also india. the thing
of our troops gave their lives. both of our nations emerged from the british empire and the united states was among the first countries to recognize an independent union of berma. we were proud to found an american center here and to build exchanges with schools like this one. and through decades of differences, americans have been united in their affection for this country and its people. above all, i came here because of america's belief in human dignity. over the last several decades, our two countries became strangers. but today, i can tell you that we always remain hopeful. you gave us hope and we bore witness to your courage. we saw the activists dressed in white visit the families of political prisoners on sundays and monks protesting peacefully in the streets. we learned of ordinary people who organized relief teams to respond to a cyclone, and heard the voices of students and the beats oh of hip-hop artists projecting the sound of freedom. and we were inspired by the fierce dignity of aung sung suu chi as she proved no human can be truly in prison if hope burns in your heart. whe
it almost laughable that a united states congressman would lecture anyone about fiscal responsibility. you heard it not once, not twice, but five times, congressman. you voted and the results increased the deficit by $200 billion. >> find key house and senate in government races from across the country. find it at c-span.org/2012. >> we have a debate in rhode island's first house district. we will be live on c-span tomorrow night at 730 eastern from rhode island college. we will also be live on friday with the senate debate in the state of maine. six canids are running for the state of maine. the candidates include republican charlie summers and cynthia gild and angus king. our coverage is on c-span2 on friday at 7:00 p.m. eastern. >> through election day, what are coverage. coming up next, the u.s. air relations. including the discussion of the relationship between u.s., israel, and iran. then we will hear the "washington post" cybersecurity summit. we have several live events to tell you about tomorrow. gregorie dinero will be on to discuss the future of the army. and president obama's c
on centuries of federal borrowing. >> the united states was going into default. we defaulted on many obligations to foreign creditors and to our own soldiers. >> brown: plus, every month, 1,000 young americans are infected with h.i.v., and most of those with the disease don't even know they have it. hari sreenivasan looks at a new report from the c.d.c. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: washington's struggle to avoid going off the "fiscal cliff" resumed in earnest today. the president moved to draw on his reelection victory for new clout with congress. the goal: a sweeping defi
, president obama greeted the man who will soon lead the united states' neighbor to the south. >> this is a longstanding tradition. >> suarez: as cameras flashed the newly re-elected u.s. president met this afternoon with the newly elected president of of mexico. nieto who takes office saturday. >> mexico has become not simply an important bilateral partner but is today a very important multilateral, multinational leader on a whole range of issues from energy to climate change and we look forward to working with mexico not only on regional issues but also on global issues. >> we also share a very important vision, a vision of creating more jobs. we know this is very important not only for the american people but also for the mexican people. for both our nations. but not only that, we also have the opportunity to integrate north america to be participating in this part of the world. >> suarez: their most immediate challenge may be the surge of drug violence in recent years. outgoing mexican president calderon wage war on the cartels at a cost of 60,000 dead over six years. but
this time the united states introduced numerous political, cultural and economic ideas to the rest of the world. >> good afternoon. thank you for joining us here at the heritage foundation in our louis lehrman auditorium. we welcome those who join us on our web site on all these occasions. if you'll be so kind to check cell phones one last time and see that they're turned off. thank you, larry. amazing how many speakers actually start doing that when i say that. we will post the program on our web site within 24 hours for our future reference and, of course, our internet viewers are always welcome to e-mail us with questions or comments, simply writing those to speaker@heritage.org. our guest today, dr. larry schweikart, is a native of arizona. he earned his bachelor and master's degree at arizona state university and received his doctorate from the university of california santa barbara. throughout his high school and college, however, he spent most of his time playing drums in a vary of -- variety of rock bands. he was part of several groups, one of which opened for steppen wolf
as shit about protecting the united states of america. [laughter] he is a true patriot. it is my honor present to you leon panetta. [applause] >> thank you for that kind introduction. i am always reminded of my father, who was an immigrant from italy with my mother, and my earliest recollections were washing in the back of the restaurant. my parents believed that child labor was a requirement. then he bought a farm in carmel valley after the war. he planted walnut trees and i remember working in the walnut orchard. my father would go around -- when the trees got older we would go around and shake the branches, and my brother and i would be collecting walnuts. when i got elected to congress, my father said, you have been well trained to go to washington, because you have been dodging nuts your whole life, and i have been successfully dodging them my whole life. i listen to the positions, and i will tell you a story. when events occurred at the cia last week, my wife immediately gave me a call. [laughter] she said, i hope there is no way the president is going to ask you to take that jo
>>> welcome to nhk world "newsline." >>> the united states and china have joined the final day of asean leaders meetings in cambodia. the two most powerful nations are competing for influence in the asia-pacific region. discussions on economic and security policies were expected to be intense. patchari raksawong reports from phnom penh. patchari? >>> the east asia summit was the big final meeting of the series of asean summits. the focus was how to deal with maritime disputes in the south china sea. the united states called on the parties to sign up to a legally binding code of conduct, or coc. china said the disputes should not be internationalized, an indirect reference to the united states. u.s. president barack obama and chinese premier wen jiabao held bilateral talks before the summit began on tuesday. they both seek closer ties with southeast asian countries as part of their competing regional strategies. >> it's important that our two countries cooperate to build a more secure and prosperous future for the asia-pacific region and for the world. >> despite their friendly
smuggled from mexico to the interior of the united states, going through travels by myself in the back of the trunk of a car, things of that nature. it was quite dramatic but something i did with a lot of pride because i felt going after those seeking a better life in the united states i share those stories with you in my book the shadow catcher. >> there are many powerful moments you describe. i am wondering if you could share a couple of those with us. in particular, a juncture where you are actually stopped by the u.s. border patrol as you enter and you are in an operation. >> that was one of many dramatic moments, i was the new mexico state trooper. you will see the picture in my book, i had a big afro and long hair and when i was a federal agent, picked me up. quite dramatic and had been under cover by myself in mexico. i had been in a small hotel in mexico that was fully invested and sleeping on the cement floor in el paso in one room and included women, children and myself. was a prospective not seen by many agents. there were a drug lot of dramatic moments i went through that i
't, or is this more of a ceremonial, the united states doing what it has to do? >> i building don't think it's necessarily ceremonial. i think they are hoping there will be pressure on both sides to try and get this at least resolvesed for some time so things can calm down and not escalate to a ground war. we heard from u.n. secretary-general ban ki-moon, that a ground war would be the worst thing, because it would cause potential of regional conflict, not just with gaza so there is this whole worry this will turn into more of an escalation. they have come here, hillary clinton has come to try and see if she can find some thread to kind of hold the two sides together. will it happen? we'll have to wait and see. a lot of talk about cease-fires over the past few days, and just hasn't happened. and the people on both sides, i mean, we've gone to places in gaza where entire homes are destroyed, where people have lost their children. we've also been homes on this side of the border, birr sheva, a girl inside, studying, terrified, and seeing the damage and destroyed lives of these families. no one
and then president of the united states. this is something which everyone you knows him knows about because he talks about it all the time. he goes to georgetown and from georgetown he becomes a candidate for a rhodes fellowship and goes to -- he cannot have a sustained ongoing relationship with a woman. he is attracted to the kind of women his mother directs him to gore the beauty queens, who are the ones who are flirtatious and who are attractive and that is really where his eyes had been. and tell the goes to yale law school. there he meets hillary rodham. >> you can watch this and other programs on line at booktv.org. now on booktv, nicole eustace examines the effects the war of 1812 had on american politics and patriotism. the author reports at the end of the three year war resulted in the quote era of good feelings marked by defuse partisanship and greater nationalism. it's a little over an hour. [applause] >> thank you very much for that introduction and thank you to the david library for hosting me. to real it's a real pleasure to be here and to see all of you this afternoon. thank you. the
i mean by that is, it takes 67 votes to change a rule here in the united states sena senate. that's a rule, by the way, that dates back to 1917. and the reason that's in place is because obviously, you know, folks wanted to force the majority and the minority to work together to make those rule changes. you don't get a two-thirds vote without that. and i think that's important, that the basic rules are ones that are agreed on. we tend to change parties a lot around here. in fact, we've shifted back and forth between republicans and democrats seven times in the past 30 years. and so at one point you're in the majority, one time in the minority, and that's why having these basic rules in place seems to me to make sense. there are some proposing that we get around that 67-vote majority by some procedure where instead of having a two-thirds vote, you would just have a majority vote to change a rule. and regardless of what rule that might be, some would say it would be on the motion to proceed and other aspects of the filibuster, of course, it would set a precedent that it could change
institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.] the speaker pro tempore: on this vote the yeas are 243. the speaker: the nays are 164. the previous question is ordered. the house will be in order and members will please take their seats. members will please take their seats. the house will be in order. the chair lays before the house a communication. the clerk: the honorable the speaker, house of representatives, sir, i have the honor to transmit herewith a scanned copy of a letter received from the honorable kimberly, lieutenant governor, secretary of state, state of new jersey, according to the unofficial returns to the special election held november 6, 2012, the honorable donald m. payne jr. was elected representative to the congress for the 10th congressional district, state of new jersey. with best wished i am, signed sincerely, karen l. haas. the speaker: furred the gentleman from new
as a foreigner from mexico to the interior of the united states, going to travel by myself in the back of a u-haul, a chunk of a car can think of that nature. so it was quite dramatic, but it was something i did with a lot of pride because i went after those who abuse those seeking a better life in the united states and a share those stories with you in ibook, "the shadow catcher." >> there's many powerful moments that you describe. i'm wondering if you could share a couple of those with less. one that i'm thinking in particular is the juncture where you are actually stopped by the u.s. border patrol as you enter and you're in an operation. >> that was one of many germanic moments. a new mexico state trooper a yield through the picture in my book. i debate afro, long hair. when i told him i was a federal agent, i think he wanted to laugh it off and lock me up. but it was quite dramatic and i've been undercover by myself in mexico. i have actually been in a small hotel in mexico. it was flea infested. and sleeping on the cement floor in el paso in one room and it included women, children and m
. i'm terrell brown. barack obama has been reelected president of the united states. mr. obama won a second term in office defeating mitt romney following an often nasty and costly election. democrats have retained control of the senate, republicans continue to control the house. president obama won a decisive victory over mitt romney racking up wins in at least 7 of 9 battleground states. the president won in wisconsin and iowa's six electoral votes, a state that launched his first campaign and the key western state of nevada. but it was ohio that pushed the president over the 270 electoral votes needed to win. it was a commanding win for the president in the electoral college, but the popular vote was neck and neck. in his victory speech, mr. obama promised better days ahead. >> while our road has been hard, while our journey has been long, we have picked ourselves up, we have fought our way back, and we know in our hearts that for the united states of america, the best is yet to come. >> the president watched the returns in his hometown of chicago. bigad shaban is there. >> repo
to lead us in our pledge of allegiance. >> i pledge allegiance to the flag at the united states of america, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation, under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. >> please be seated. it is now my distinct privilege to introduce the members of the veterans day national committee. the committee was formed by presidential order in 1954 to hold this annual observance in honor of america's veterans and to encourage and support veterans day observances throughout the nation. please hold your applause until i have introduced these special guests. if you are able, please stand when i called your name. delaney. harold fritz. national commander, disabled american veterans. national president, military officers association of america. legislative director of polish legion of american veterans. national president of korean war veterans association. albert gonzales, national commander of american gi forum. national commander, a jewish war veterans of the usa. national commander of american express years of war. national commander of catholic war
an easy laugh, but as he would say, he is serious as shit about protecting the united states of america. he is a true patriot. it is my honor present to you leon panetta. >> thank you for that kind introduction. i am always reminded of my father, who was an immigrant from italy with my mother, and my earliest recollections were washing in the back of the restaurant. then he bought a farm in carmel valley after the war. my father would go around -- when the trees got older we would go around and shake the branches, and my brother and i would be collecting walnuts. when i got elected to congress, my father said, you have been well trained to go to washington, because you have been dodging nuts your whole life, and i have been successfully dodging them my whole life. i listen to the positions, and i will tell you a story. when events occurred at the cia last week, my wife immediately gave me a call. [laughter] she said, i hope there is no way the president is going to ask you to take that job again. i said no, he's been there, done that. it is an honor to have the chance to share some tho
with president obama. secretary of state, hillary clinton said the united states and egypt will work together in working toward long-term peace in the middle east. listen. >> the united states welcomes the agreement today if a cease-fire in gaza, and now a broader calm returns. >> the truce is hours after a bomb tore through a bus near israel's defense ministry in tel aviv. the explosion injured two dozen people, hamas leaders praised the attack but did not take responsibility. in gaza, israel struck more than 100 targets including hamas government buildings. officials in the palestinian territory set to strike and killed to dozen including to children. we have coverage from jonathan hunt at the united nations but, first, we go to david lee miller on the ground in southern israel. >>reporter: the question, is the cease-fire going to hold? we are about a mile or so from the israeli and gaza border. this city has been pounded relentlessly for years by rocket fire. a short time after the cease-fire took affect local time there was a rocket warning taking place. you can see the city is deserted w
of you in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. in two days america will pick its president for the next four years. we'll take two different looks at this moment in time. first a global perspective. we've assembled experts from europe, middle east, and asia to tell us how the rest of the world sees this election. then i have a panel of distinguished historians, walter isa isaacson, sean wilentz and edmund morris to look at an eye to the past. what do past campaigns and past presidents tell us about this nail-biter? also americans might be anxious to learn tuesday's results of the chinese are even more anxious, perhaps, to learn who their new leaders will be, why they might have more at stake than we do. but first here's my take. whoever wins the election on tuesday, on wednesday either barack obama or mitt romney will have to start worrying about the same urgent challenge, how to stop the united states from falling over the fiscal cliff. this is, of course, the second cliff hanger that the united states has faced in two years, the first being the debt ceiling deba
. and this is an example of the united states giving to the region and not taking away from it. >> do you see it as being a part of american diplomacy to the middle east? >> only ander equine because leadership of that school has maintained its independence for the united states government, which i think is appropriate, and practical. but, it serves the american interest in the sense that it gives middle easterners and with a background that house the humanitarian presence in the middle east. it's not always been about access, a close relationship with israel or deploying the military force for the purpose of the national security and americans spend their for injured 50 years given to the region and much more practical and beneficial ways for the people in the region and not just for us. that's why in the book i wanted them to inouye and then i wanted the american people to know that story. >> who was michael and what happened to him? >> a professor at the science of ucla who happened to leave before it arrived to work on my ph.d.. he had gone up in beirut and his family was on the faculty. though he ha
will be the united states of america. >> just getting a little update here. i'll tell you in a minute on florida, but welcome back to our special second hour of "the daily rundown." i'm chuck todd. let's see where we stand this hour and how the president night. the president put together a decisive victory last night. falling short of the votes he won in 2008 against john mccain. but he had 303. romney 206. florida's are still on the technically remain too close to call. miami-dade county is counting 20,000 absentee ballots they tell us. that's what they're counting right now. that's in miami-dade. that largest chunk of vote. if that breaks away the way they're going, it's impossible. i guess nothing's impossible. president obama is going to get that one too. it'll be 323 electoral votes when all is s if you will. i want to go to ohio because ohio was a big deal at the time. what was interesting here is where the margins were. it was all wasn't -- this was reduplicating the map. here's what the county map looksnow. i'll go to 2008. if anything, he did better in coal country as you
in reciting the pledge of allegiance to the flag. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the presiding officer: the clerk will read a communication to the senate. the clerk: washington, d.c, november 29, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable tom udall, a senator from the state of new mexico, to perform the duties f the chair. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: following leader remarks, the senate will be in a period of morning business for an hour, republicans will control the first half, the majority the second half. following morning business, the senate will resume consideration of the defense authorization act. we'll continue to work through amendments to the bill during today's session. roll call votes are expected all through the day mr. president, i would now y
in the 21st century, and as an american i want that to be the united states. this is an issue that can be solved. the american people are way ahead of where their elected representatives are coming and i look at the composition in this room and there is a generation gap. i find that the older people are the less receptive they are to immigration reform the younger they are the more receptive they are to immigration reform, and i have a column in the post that i would encourage all of you to read called the night of the gop began to lose the 2012 election and that was the night that governor rick perry got booed by the audience for defending in-state tuition were for the children of undocumented workers in texas which passed in 2001 with only five state legislators voting against it. do you know how difficult it is to get all but five texas state legislators to agree on anything? it's almost impossible. they won't even agree on what time the sun came up, but they agreed to this legislation because a was right for texas and for these young people. this is the low hanging fruit. they've d
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